508-255-0557 current patient

Anchorage Tools Help Orthodontists Correct Complex Bite Problems

While braces are often the stars for straightening smiles, they’re not the only cast members in an orthodontic production. Orthodontists occasionally turn to other appliances if the bite problem is challenging. Whatever the tool, though, they usually have something in common””they use the principle of anchorage.


To understand anchorage, let’s first consider the classic kid’s game Tug of War. With teams on either end of a rope, the object is to pull the opposing team across the center line before they pull you. To maximize your pulling force, the player at the back of your rope, usually your stoutest member, holds steady or “anchors” the rest of the team.


Like a Tug of War team, braces exert force against the teeth. This stimulates the supporting periodontal ligament to remodel itself and allow the teeth to move. The braces use the teeth they are attached to as anchors, which in a lot of cases are the back teeth. By attaching a thin wire to the brackets or braces on the teeth, the orthodontist includes all the teeth on the arch, from one end to the other. Anchored in place, the wire can maintain a constant pressure against the teeth to move them.


But not all bite situations are this straightforward. Sometimes an orthodontist needs to influence jaw growth in addition to teeth movement. For this purpose, they often use orthodontic headgear, which runs around the back of the head or neck and attaches to orthodontic brackets on the teeth. It still involves an anchor but in this case it’s the patient’s own skull.


In some situations, an orthodontist may feel he or she needs more anchorage as the teeth alone may not be enough. For this, they might establish a separate or additional anchor point using a temporary anchorage device (TAD). A TAD resembles a tiny screw that’s inserted into the jawbone near the tooth intended for movement. The orthodontist can then attach the TAD to braces hardware using some form of elastics. After treatment, they remove the TAD.
These are just a couple examples of specialized tools an orthodontist can use for bite correction. Thanks to them and similar devices, even the most complex bite problem can be overcome to create a healthier and more attractive smile.


If you would like more information on correcting a poor bite, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Orthodontic Headgear & Other Anchorage Appliances.”

Leave a Reply

Dental Arts Studio of Cape Cod

North Eastham, MA
55 Oak Road North Eastham, MA 02651

Leave a review on Google

West Harwich, MA
129 MA-28, WEST HARWICH, MA 02671

Leave a review on Google

Monday – Friday: 8:00am – 6:00pm
Saturday – Sunday: On-call emergencies

Dmitry L.
Highly recommend Dr.Pokrovskaya. She is always on time, professional and knowledgable. Doctor Pokrovskaya uses the latest techniques and equipment. Very easy to locate, convenient hours.
Al S.
Hands-down the best Dentist on Cape Cod! When I called on a Friday afternoon just before they closed they accepted us as a new patient with one of my children who had an emergency. Her staff was very kind and considerate Dr. Nadia went above and beyond to make my child feel comfortable. She took her time to explain everything to her mother and I. I would unequivocably recommend her practice!
Jamie N.
Not only is Dr. Pokrovskaya brilliant, but she is caring and gentle. After talking to her about my dental concerns I am confident in placing my trust in her expertise and skill. She takes the time to really consider what is right for you in your unique situation. She has so many skills that she can include in her assessment of what is needed and that makes her a top notch professional.
Dental website by progressive dental

© All Rights Reserved